PLASTIC & CONCRETE:

Two invasive and contradictive materials that offer a wide range of

possibilities to be explored, both metaphorically and literally.

Plastic and concrete can undeniably be seen as volatile materials that symbolise the interfering, destructive nature of human living on this planet, eventually damaging and sealing off all the potential for living a fulfilled live. Also, concrete in the illustrative sense, lends itself as mean to describe psychological barriers as in stubbornness, ideology, intolerance, hardliners or walling something up… again…

Looking at the current worldwide development, one could argue that the pillars are crumbling, the walls are growing higher.

Yet, the negative connotations that both plastics and concrete are charged with, seem to provoke me to oppose these associations and infuse those materials with more positive features. The more I look at them, the more I am becoming intrigued and the more I enjoy working with concrete and discarded plastic items, bottles in particular. Hence the practical side of my work involves me exploring ways to not only treat the two matters seperately but also find solutions to combine them.


The survey that I carried out during my previous exhibition in May 2018, “Pink Yoghurt – A Childhood Behind The Iron Curtain“ is the source of my attempt to further examine values such as freedom, peace, hope or comfort (which according to the questions answered) represent our innermost ambitions and desires. Those values are, I believe, connected to the literal and metaphorical concepts of barriers and, or versus pillars. The more we are trying to establish e.g. freedom and comfort (wealth), the more, so it seems, we move away from it, notionally, emotionally and practically.


A paradox arises between our pursuit of freedom, peace, love, comfort and our actual way of living. With my work, I am striving to uncover and translate these contradictory developments (in a scale however small it might be compared to the greater picture, I know!)


WHAT I WANT - Survey
PINK YOGURT Project